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DRIL Procedure for Radial-Basilic Forearm Transposition Arteriovenous Fistula
Babatunde H Almaroof1, Jonathan A Higgins1, Samuel N Steerman1, Sadaf S Ahanchi1, Jean M Panneton1, Todd W Gensler2
1Division of Vascular Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA;2Sentara Vascular Specialists, Hampton, VA


A 61-year-old male presented with a 3-month history of a non-healing ulceration of his left middle finger. He had a history of end stage renal disease and had undergone a left forearm autogenous radial-basilic forearm transposition arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access four years prior to presentation. Steal syndrome was suspected and an arch aortogram and left upper extremity arteriogram were performed which confirmed our suspicion as retrograde flow from the radial artery into the fistula was demonstrated.
Revascularization of his left hand was achieved by performing a left forearm DRIL (Distal Revascularization and Interval Ligation) procedure. A 15cm segment of great saphenous vein was harvested from his left thigh and used as a conduit for a radio-radial artery bypass. The proximal anastomosis was constructed in an end-to side fashion 12cm proximal to the radio-basilic anastomosis. The radial artery was then ligated distal to the fistula and the outflow anastomosis was performed on the radial artery distal to its ligated portion.
He did require an amputation of his left middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx due to osteomyelitis but he was able to heal the amputation site well.
He presented about 8 months after his DRIL procedure with pain at the amputation site and non-invasive arterial physiologic studies with finger pressures were suggestive of arterial insufficiency due to a proximal anastomotic stenosis. He had an angiogram that revealed a significant stenosis at the proximal anastomosis (Figure 1) which responded well to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (Figure 2). His fistula has remained patent and functional. He does not have any ischemic lesions on his left hand and the pain in his third finger has improved.


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