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5-year F/BEVAR Outcomes for Treatment of Complex Anatomy Aortic Aneurysms Based on Aneurysm Extent
Stephen J Raulli, F. Ezequiel Parodi, Vivian C Gomes, Priya Vasan, Dichen Sun, William A. Marston, Luigi Pascarella, Katharine L. McGinigle, Jacob C. Wood, Mark A. Farber
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Background: Fenestrated/branched endovascular repair (F/BEVAR) of complex anatomy aortic aneurysms (cAAA) is being employed as the preferred technique in a growing number of patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the 5-year outcomes of F/BEVAR procedures for the treatment of cAAA, stratified by the aneurysm extent.Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of cAAA, who underwent F/BEVAR at a single center, were included in the study and retrospectively analyzed. The population was divided according to the aneurysm extent, comparing group 1 (types I-III thoracoabdominal aneurysms - TAAA), group 2 (type IV TAAA), and group 3 (pararenal aortic aneurysms - PRAA). The primary end points were technical success, mortality, occurrence of spinal cord ischemia, primary patency of the visceral arteries, freedom from target vessel instability (TVI), and secondary interventions.Results: Of 436 patients who underwent F/BEVAR between July 2012 and May 2023, 131 presented with types I-III TAAA, 69 with type IV TAAA, and 236 with PRAA. All cases were treated under a physician-sponsored IDE protocol with a custom-manufactured or off-the-shelf device. Group 1 had significantly younger patients than group 2 or 3 respectively (69.6 8.7 vs 72.47.1 vs 73.2 7.3, P<.001) and had a higher percentage of females (50.4% vs 21.7% vs 17.1%, P<.001). Prior history of aortic dissection was significantly more common among patients in group 1 (26% vs 1.4% vs 0.9%, P<.001), and mean aneurysm diameter was larger in group 1 (64.5 vs 60.7 vs 63.2 mm, P=.033). Comorbidities were similar between groups, except for coronary artery disease (P<.001) and tobacco use (P=.003), which were less prevalent in group 1. Technical success was similar in the three groups (98.5% vs 98.6% vs 98.7%, P>.99). There was no significant difference in the 30-day mortality (9.2% vs 4.3% vs 3.8%, P=.093). The incidence of spinal cord ischemia was significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 3 (5.3 vs 4.3% vs .4%, P =.004). Mean follow-up was significantly longer among patients in group 3 (24.324.3 months, 27.527.1 months, 32.7 25.5 months, P=.003). The 5-year survival (Figure 1) was significantly higher in group 3 when compared to group 1 (log-rank P=.01). Freedom from secondary intervention (Figure 2) was significantly higher in group 3 when compared to group 1 (log-rank P=.003). At 5 years, there was no significant difference in freedom from TVI between groups or primary patency in the 1652 target vessels examined. Conclusions: Larger aneurysm extension was associated with lower 5-year survival, higher incidence of secondary interventions and spinal cord ischemia. The prevalence of secondary interventions in all groups make meticulous follow-up a priority in TAAA patients treated with F/BEVAR. patency


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