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Hybrid Repair of an Isolated Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm associated with a Right-Sided Aortic Arch
Jason R Crowner, Mark A Farber, Raghuveer Vallabhaneni
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Hybrid Repair of an Isolated Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Associated with a Right-sided Aortic Arch.
Right-sided aortic arch is a rare variant of aortic anatomy that can be accompanied by an aberrant origin of the left subclavian artery. We report a case of an isolated left subclavian artery with aneurysmal degeneration associated with a right-sided aortic arch and a Kommerell’s diverticulum.
A 52-year-old male underwent routine trauma evaluation with a CT of the head, neck, and chest after a motor vehicle accident for upper extremity weakness. CT angiogram of his neck demonstrated a right-sided aortic arch with a 6.3 cm diverticulum arising from the left side of the arch. Additionally there was an isolated left subclavian artery aneurysm of 3 cm not communicating with the aorta. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated retrograde flow from the vertebral artery. Based upon the patient’s evaluation, a left sided brachial plexus injury was additionally diagnosed and felt unrelated to his aneurysmal disease.
A combined open and endovascular surgical approach was utilized in the treatment of this patient’s aneurysms. A thoracic endograft was planned for exclusion of the Kommerell’s diverticulum. To achieve an adequate landing zone, a right carotid to subclavian artery bypass with an 8mm PTFE graft and concomitant right vertebral transposition to the thyrocervical trunk was deemed necessary. The exclusion of the diverticulum was accomplished in a staged fashion with placement of a Gore cTAG device placed in the descending thoracic aorta. A left carotid-subclavian bypass graft and transposition of the left vertebral artery on to the graft was subsequently performed to treat the isolated Left subclavian artery aneurysm,
The patient’s post-operative course was uneventful with respect to stroke or new upper extremity symptoms, however he did undergo cardioversion for atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response shortly after the implantation of the thoracic endograft. During follow-up there has been a steady improvement in his upper extremity brachial plexus injuries with physical therapy. There was a resolution of differential upper extremity blood pressure measurements following the procedure.
To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an isolated subclavian artery aneurysm associated with a right-sided aortic arch and Kommerell’s diverticulum. Hybrid endovascular repair is an effective way of treating this rare complex problem.
Figure 1. Pretreatment CT angiogram demonstrating isolated left subclavian artery aneurysm as well as Kommerell’s diverticulum and right-sided aortic arch.


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